Tag Archives: JAFF

Elizabeth and Van Gogh

fotos van gohg

I fell in love with Vincent Van Gogh when I was a teenager and started looking into art. His paintings marveled me. I loved the colors and textures, but most of all, I loved the feelings I could sense from his paintings.

As years passed by, I became even more passionate about Van Gogh, especially after knowing his life story.

I know I am not alone in my passion for Van Gogh, and I knew one person in particular who loved him more than even me: my friend Liliana Saraiva. She accompanied me in my craziness for him, and with her, I had long conversations about his paintings and his life. But most of all, together, we visited the most emblematic places in Van Gogh’s life: Auvers-Sur-Oise, Arles, St. Remy en Provence, Theo’s House in Paris, etc.

Liliana fought a long battle against a devastating decease, and at the age of 30 left this world. Today would be her 32nd birthday, and this post, and the review of a book that combines both our mutual love for Van Gogh, and my love for Pride and Prejudice, are my present to her. This the small tribute I can offer, and I like to believe that if she were here, she would be smiling with the contagious and open smile she always had.

elizabeth and van gogh3 stars

Elizabeth and Van Gogh takes place in 1888 in the Southern French village of Arles, and will show us the last years of Vincent Van Gogh’s life. In this cross over between Pride and Prejudice and Van Gogh’s life, Elizabeth’s love story will not be the main storyline as we will read about an intense and special friendship Elizabeth created with Van Gogh, and see how that friendship will influence the course of her life.

I think it is important to advise you that the characters we see in this book are not the same ones from the original book placed in a different era, they are descendants of Darcy and Elizabeth, and for that reason, their personalities are different. So don’t expect to encounter our beloved Lizzy and Mr. Darcy, you will see Cassandra Elizabeth Bennett and William Darcy.

Elizabeth is a washerwoman and an aspiring artist who is currently living with her aunt and Uncle Gardiner, and William Darcy is an American artist who comes to visit his aunt Catherine de Bourgh in Arles. Portraying both characters as artists was a twist I really enjoyed, even though I could not picture Darcy as a painter.

Apart from Elizabeth and Darcy, the other main character in this book is Vincente Van Gogh, and the story starts with him living in the Yellow House at Arles with Elizabeth and Jane being the only friends who genuinely care for him. He is living with Paul Gauguin, but Gauguin is what I would picture him to be: a selfish being who does not care for Vincent and is only interested in his mistresses. Elizabeth dislikes Paul Gauguin as much as I do, and knowing the author has the same opinion as me concerning this painter was something I found very shooting. I also liked the implication the author does regarding his involvement in the ear incident, and wonder if that was what really happened.

I loved the idea of P&P crossing over with Van Gogh’s life, it was the perfect premise for me, but unfortunately I did not love the book. It had some interesting ideas behind it, but I don’t think it was as accomplished as it could have been. I didn’t feel much intensity in Elizabeth and Darcy’s love and I could not relate to these new characters as I did with the Darcy and Elizabeth from 1812. Also, the ending was very disappoint for me. Darcy is placed in a position where he needs to choose between Elizabeth and his wealth and, he gives up on Elizabeth and their love. He does this after declaring to love her and making her go across the ocean with him to meet his family. I cannot believe our Darcy would give up on Elizabeth after he had acknowledged he loved her, nor do I believe our Elizabeth would forgive him so easily. I know these are not the same characters, but I truly did not like to see Darcy as a coward who would just let Elizabeth go after having admitted he loved her.

There were some other aspects in the book that I believe not to have been very well accomplished: Elizabeth introduces herself to Darcy as Cassandra, and at Rosa Parie everyone called her that, however without any explanation Darcy started calling her Elizabeth a bit later. Furthermore, I could not understand the reasons behind Darcy’s insult to Elizabeth at the art exhibition. I believe it was an attempt to establish a link between this book and the original insult at the Meryton Assembly, but it seemed to me a little forced.

I did like to see the author use the colors to create a metaphor with people’s personalities. I think it was very interesting and a plus to the book. I also enjoyed Col. Fitzwilliam’s character as he was interesting and intriguing. While reading the book I always felt curious about what he was discovering and what secrets he was hiding.

Overall, I liked reading this book because it made me wonder about Van Gog’s life. Might he have lived longer had he someone like Elizabeth at his side? Would his fate be the same? And what about his paintings, would they change with the presence of a friend who believed in him?

The friendship between Vincent and Elizabeth was something I could related with, and I enjoyed reading the scenes between these 2 characters, but the love story between Elizabeth and Darcy did not captivated me and that is why I did not gave a higher rate to this book.

Elizabeth & Van Gogh is available at:

Amazon.com – Elizabeth & Van Gogh

Amazon.co.uk- Elizabeth & Van Gogh: A Pride and Prejudice Reimagining

Amazon.fr – Elizabeth & Van Gogh: A Pride and Prejudice Reimagining

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Filed under 3 stars, Pride and Prejudice

A Little Whimsical in His Civilities – Guest Post by J. Marie Croft

alwihchorizontalbanner

Hello Dear readers,

Today I’m lucky to receive in From Pemberley to Milton J. Marie Croft with a guest post as part of her blog tour for A Little Whimsical in His Civilities.

Her guest post made me think about Mr. Darcy and whether he is whimsical or not. If someone told me that he was, I would immediately dismiss and deny it, but Mrs. Croft raised some interesting points, after all he does change a little…

I will leave you to read, think and comment J. Marie Croft’s, post, and I hope you enjoy it as much as I did 🙂

 

***Blurb***

Told entirely from Fitzwilliam Darcy’s point of view, J. Marie Croft’s humorous novella, A Little Whimsical in His Civilities, spans one moonlit, autumnal night upon the gentleman’s return to Hertfordshire in pursuit of Elizabeth Bennet.

 

“We take the turning which places us on Meryton’s main road, and—oh, gad! There it is—the base-court building which passes for an assembly hall in this godforsaken place. For me, the venue shall be either a heaven or a hell tonight. My palms grow clammy, my gut churns, and I regret that second helping of onion-laden vegetable pie forced on me before we left.”

 

Accompany Darcy as he, intent on reversing the disastrous first impression he made there, braves another Meryton assembly and seeks to win his heart’s desire.

 

***Guest Post***

Thanks, Rita, for allowing me the honour of writing a guest post for your blog. Because you’ve been so gracious … and brave (After all, one never knows what nonsense might leak forth from my pen!), your reward will be an entirely pun-free post. There’ll be no wordplay, I promise. But, because I’m a word nerd, this will be about words … or, at least, one in particular.

whimsical font

Within the pages of Pride and Prejudice, one of my favourite words is spoken by Mr. Gardiner while he, his wife, and Elizabeth are leaving Pemberley the first time.

 

“But perhaps he may be a little whimsical in his civilities,” replied her uncle. “Your great men often are; and therefore I shall not take him at his word about fishing, as he might change his mind another day, and warn me off his grounds.” ~ Jane Austen

 

When Austen used whimsical in that passage, she conveyed Mr. Gardiner’s leeriness of Mr. Darcy’s invitation to fish at the estate’s stream. He supposed such an eminent gentleman might be capricious – temperamental, changeable, unpredictable.

 

Whimsical may not be the first word one thinks of when asked to describe Fitzwilliam Darcy, but he is changeable. For the love of Elizabeth Bennet, he amends his ways and becomes a better man.

 

Accordingly, the word whimsical is used in the capricious context in my novella’s title. Albeit the outwardly well-mannered Mr. Darcy in that story might be described more aptly as a little snarky in his thoughts. For instance, initially he thinks of Mr. Jones as a pestiferous, hedge-born minnow. Later in the story, Mr. Jones is thought of as ‘the accommodating apothecary’. See? Mr. Darcy does change for the better, not only in his mind but in his outlook on life. He’s changeable.

 

I’m glad Austen used ‘whimsical’ instead of the more uncomplimentary ‘capricious’ (given to sudden and unaccountable changes of mood or behaviour). However, I prefer the word whimsical for its other meaning. Although Johnson’s Dictionary includes ‘freakish’, the second sense of whimsical is playfully quaint, oddly fanciful, unusual, especially in an appealing and amusing way.

 

Since fanciful means over-imaginative and unrealistic, some may say Pride and Prejudice’s Mr. Darcy is, indeed, whimsical in the fanciful sense — a ‘too-good-to-be-true’ fictional character.

 

He’s not all goodness, though. He has his peccadillos; and we all, at times, own churlish opinions. So, what insults, slurs, set-downs, or – heaven forbid! –bawdy thoughts might run through Mr. Darcy’s mind? Jane Austen gave us few clues as to what the gentleman was thinking. So I, rather audaciously, plunked myself inside the man’s head and changed the events following his and Bingley’s return to Hertfordshire in the autumn after Hunsford.

 

At one point in the novella, while thinking of (and lusting after) Elizabeth, Mr. Darcy dances with another young lady.

 

… I am so thankful you cannot read minds.

Casting me a distrustful glance, the lady tosses her head and looks away.

What? Oh God, you cannot read minds, can you? No, no, of course not.

 

Oh, Darcy, your dance partner can’t read your mind, but readers of A Little Whimsical in His Civilities certainly can.

 

Now I’d like to get inside your head and know your thoughts about the word whimsical and what it means to you. What sort of images does that word conjure up in your mind?

 

For me, whimsical often implies a sense of unworldliness, as in things mystical, imaginative, fantastic, or fey. Like this.

fairy & unicorn

These wooden dolls exemplify the playfully quaint kind of whimsy found in folk art.

WOODEN DOLLS

 

All manner of quirky, off-the-wall (or dangling-from-the ceiling) items – such as whirligigs, zany sunglasses, or eye-catching umbrellas – might be considered whimsical.

witch legs

 

Then there’s the ethereal, delicate sort of whimsy … things like fireflies, dandelion fluff, and twinkly lights.

                                                                                           dandelion fireflies

 

Those images were gathered for my Pinterest board, What’s Whimsical? Have a look there, and see if you agree with my choices. Another board, A Little Whimsical in His Civilities features quotes from the novella accompanied by befitting imagery.

Your thoughts on Whimsical (the word, my Pinterest board, or my novella ) will be appreciated.

 

***Author Bio***

Marie Croft is a self-proclaimed word nerd and adherent of Jane Austen’s quote “Let other pens dwell on guilt and misery”. Her light-hearted novel, Love at First Slight(Meryton Press, 2013), her humorous short story, Spyglasses and Sunburns, in the Sun-Kissed: Effusions of Summeranthology (Meryton Press, 2015), and her novella, A Little Whimsical in His Civilities (Meryton Press, 2016) bear witness to Joanne’s fondness for Pride and Prejudice, wordplay, and laughter.

 

Links:

Twitter

Facebook

Amazon Author Page

Website

Pinterest

 

Purchase A Little Whimsical in His Civilities by J. Marie Croft

Amazon

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It’s giveaway time!!!

Meryton Press is sponsoring a blog tour giveaway for A Little Whimsical in His Civilities. In in the end of the blog tour 8 winners (4 ebook & 4 paperback) will be randomly selected and contacted. To enter the giveaway click on the below link 🙂

a Rafflecopter giveaway

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Blog Tour Schedule

 

2/8: Excerpt & Giveaway at My Jane Austen Book Club

2/9: Guest Post & Giveaway at Moonlight Reader

2/10: Review at Tomorrow is Another Day

2/11: Guest Post & Giveaway at So Little Time…

2/12: Excerpt at My Love for Jane Austen

2/13: Excerpt & Giveaway at More Agreeably Engaged

2/14: Guest Post & Giveaway at Liz’s Reading Life

2/15: Guest Post & Giveaway at From Pemberley to Milton

2/16: Review at Just Jane 1813

2/17: Review at Half Agony, Half Hope

2/18: Review at Margie’s Must Reads

2/19: Excerpt & Giveaway at Best Sellers and Best Stellars

2/20: Guest Post & Giveaway at Skipping Midnight

2/21: Guest Post & Giveaway at Babblings of a Bookworm

2/22: Guest Post & Giveaway at My Kids Led Me Back to Pride and Prejudice

 

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Filed under giveaway, Pride and Prejudice, Uncategorized

Accusing Elizabeth: Cover reveal, excerpt & Giveaway

Hello Dear readers,

I’m very happy to announce that today From Pemberley to Milton is doing the cover reveal and posting the first glimpse of Jennifer Joy’s new book Accusing Elizabeth!

The book will be released for sale tomorrow, and I’m very proud to have been the one Jennifer choose to let the world know about her latest project.

I hope you find the premise enticing as much as I did 🙂

 

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What must a lady do to receive a decent proposal? After refusing an atrocious proposal from a gentleman she dislikes, Elizabeth Bennet wishes she had never come to Hunsford. Foolish decisions and silent tongues conspire against Elizabeth, bringing accusations against her and those whom she holds dear, when a valuable pair of diamond earrings go missing from Rosings. Elizabeth finds a surprising ally in Mr. Darcy— the man she had so recently refused. Can Elizabeth see past her prejudice to understand her own heart? Or will she ruin her prospects to protect her friends? Fitzwilliam Darcy’s dream of a happy union is dashed to pieces when Elizabeth Bennet irrevocably refuses his offer. Sincere in his affections, he determines to win her heart. If only he can defend her when his aunt, Lady Catherine de Bourgh, suspects Elizabeth and Miss Maria Lucas of theft. Can Darcy overcome the obstacles his relatives place before him on the path to love? Will Elizabeth give him a second chance?

****

 

Now without further ado, I leave you with the cover and the excerpt…

accusingelizabeth1

 

As Charlotte left the house accompanied by the housemaid, Elizabeth marched to the back of the house and down the sloping lawn to the pig’s pen. Elizabeth had not experienced the flight of said animal, but she knew that Charlotte lived in terror of it escaping again. Every commotion Mr. Collins caused was followed by the question, “Did the pig escape again?” from Charlotte.

Walking quickly, before her sense of reason could catch up with her and stop her, Elizabeth raised the latch which secured the door to the pen. She flung open the gate and clapped a few times to set the animal in motion. It needed no further encouragement.

Squealing with the joy of its newfound freedom, the pig ran as fast as its four pink legs could carry it, its ears bouncing and its tail swishing through the air as it cut through the lawn with Elizabeth chasing after it, trying with all her might to keep up so that she might encourage it to go toward the front of the house where Charlotte could hear it.

“Charlotte! The pig is loose!” she yelled.

Charlotte, who had not walked far down the road, shoved the basket into Betsy’s hands, picked up her skirts, and ran toward the house. The look of determination on her face was a fierce thing to behold.

“You block it from that side, Lizzy. I will make sure it does not come through the gate. Maria!” she yelled.

The girl, not understanding what all the fuss was about, but observing it tranquilly through the front window, came outside.

Charlotte made no explanations, but she gave orders rather well. “See that the pig does not get into our garden.”

Maria ran to the opposite side of the house to stand guard, but Elizabeth knew that the pig must already be there. Its squeals of protest at Maria’s attempts to shoo it out of the garden confirmed its location.

Charlotte threw her hands up by her face. “Oh, no! It will uproot and eat everything. Lizzy, I need your help,” she called from over her shoulder as she ran toward the garden.

Elizabeth did not remember the last time she had run so much. Not since she was a child.

Maria was in some sort of deadlock with the offending animal. It stood with a carrot hanging out of its mouth, chomping at the greens contentedly and daring anyone to draw near.

“Maria, you get at him from the far side. I’ll go from this side. Lizzy, make sure he cannot escape through the front,” Charlotte instructed as she closed in.

Betsy, having freed herself of the basket, joined them.

With a wicked glint in its eye, the pig finished chomping on its carrot, then charged at Elizabeth. Widening her stance so she could grab the animal as it passed, it ran straight between her legs, catching her dress and pulling her down backwards. Charlotte and Betsy were quick to run to her, but the pig masterfully untangled himself from her dress, stepped over her, and continued squealing toward the open fence.

“I suppose I deserved that,” said Elizabeth to herself as she tried to get back on her feet. Thankfully, the pig was small and it had not hurt much when he stepped all over her in his haste.

Dashing across the lawn to the front of the house, they watched as the pig headed toward the open gate.

“Do not let it get out!” cried Charlotte.

Elizabeth ran with the women after the pig, wiping her loose hair out of her face.

“It must not cross into Rosings. Mr. Collins would be mortified,” insisted Charlotte.

Chasing the tireless, pink beast down the Hunsford Road, Elizabeth’s lungs burned for breath. After all this effort, Maria had best confess to Charlotte!

Down the road, two gentlemen on horseback appeared. Elizabeth gritted her teeth at the sight of Colonel Fitzwilliam and Mr. Darcy. It embarrassed her for them to see her in such a state. A great deal of her hair was loose, and her dress was covered in dirt and muddy hoof prints. But it had all been of her own doing, and she must see Charlotte’s pig safely back to its pen.

Charging through her shame as she continued in the chase, she kept her focus on the pig, waiting for her opportunity to pounce. One quick look over her shoulder confirmed that she was on her own. Maria and Betsy lagged behind her. Charlotte had slowed to a walk, having grown tired.

As the runaway animal neared the horsemen, Mr. Darcy handed his reins to Colonel Fitzwilliam and dismounted. Elizabeth had expected him to observe piously from the comfort of his seat. When he rushed the pig, turning it back to trot toward her, she could not have been more surprised.

Unfortunately, the pig must have figured that its odds were better against one man than against four resolute women, who now stood closer together. It promptly turned back to Mr. Darcy, picking up his pace.

Elizabeth, her limbs as tired as her spirits, yelled, “Please do not let the little devil past.”

Mr. Darcy took her seriously. He leaned down to grab the pig as it neared, but the pig had anticipated his move. Veering to the side just outside of Mr. Darcy’s reach, he squealed in delight at what he thought was another victory in his escape. What the pig did not count on, nor anybody else, for that matter, was for Mr. Darcy to pivot in place and pounce on top of it. He circled his arms around the squirming animal.

Colonel Fitzwilliam had his hands full with the nervous horses that did not much like a small pig darting about near their feet. He laughed so loudly, it echoed down the lane.

Without losing his hold, Mr. Darcy’s eyes shot up to glare at his audacious cousin. “Stop your cackling and make yourself useful.”

Seeing that the colonel would not be of much help with two skittish horses in his care, Elizabeth knelt down next to Mr. Darcy so that she could hold the pig’s feet and allow the gentleman to stand.

“Thank you,” he said, a scowl on his face.

Wrapping his arms around the pig’s middle, he asked, “Where does this thing belong, Mrs. Collins?”

Rushing forward, Charlotte said, “Oh, no. Please, Mr. Darcy, we will make sure it gets back into its pen. You need not trouble yourself.”

Elizabeth shook her head at her overly polite friend.

Mr. Darcy, scowl still in place, said, “Nonsense. If I loosen my hold, this ingrate will only escape again.”

“Very well,” said Charlotte as she led the way back to the pig’s pen.

They walked in silence back to the parsonage. Elizabeth did not remember running that great a distance, but the pig had covered a good deal of ground.

When the house was in view, Elizabeth chanced a glance at Mr. Darcy. She expected to see a trickle of sweat running down his brow, but there was nothing. Only a deep furrow.

As a giggle bubbled up through her throat, she wished she had not looked at him. It was ridiculous that such a fine gentleman who took himself much too seriously should be carrying a pig like it was a small child.

The pig’s ears flopped with each step, and it looked like it was having a jolly time in Mr. Darcy’s arms. It even looked like it was smiling.

That was all Elizabeth could bear. No longer able to stifle her laughter, she looked at Colonel Fitzwilliam, whom she knew she could rely on for understanding, and laughed with such delight that her stomach soon hurt.

She avoided looking at Mr. Darcy again, lest the sight renew her laughter and upset the gentleman more than she already had. But the pig joined in with its grunts and snorts, and Elizabeth peeked up through her lashes to see Mr. Darcy in the height of a large grin.

The sight almost stifled her laughter. It certainly was not what she had expected to see. Mr. Darcy’s eyes lit up and his lips curled up in the corners so bewitchingly that she had difficulty looking away from. Disarmed by his smile, she focused on the happy pig bobbing up and down in his arms.

 

 

*** Author Bio ***

authorwebWhen Jennifer isn’t busy dreaming up new adventures for her favourite Austen characters, she is teaching English, reading, perfecting her doughnut recipe, or taking her kids to the park.

Her wish is to continue to write sweet romances with happy endings for years to come.

She currently lives in Ecuador with her husband and twins. All of them are fluent in Spanglish.

Right now, Jennifer is imagining a new way to bring our beloved Darcy and Lizzy together so that they can enjoy another Happily-Ever-After.

 

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It’s giveaway time!!!

Jennifer Joy was kind enough to bring to From Pemberley to Milton four e-book copies of Accusing Elizabeth to offer to our readers across the globe.

The giveaway is international and to participate all you have to do is place your own questions to Jennifer or just share your kind words and love with her. Leave a question or comment on this post, and if you want to double your chances of winning, you can also comment on the review for Accusing Elizabeth that From Pemberley to Milton will post on the 25th of January.

The giveaway is open until the 31st of January and the lucky winners will be randomly picked and announced on the 1st of February.

Good luck everyone, and I hope you enjoyed the excerpt!!! It makes us wonder why Elizabeth is doing such a thing doesn’t it? What about the cover? It is my favourite cover from Jennifer Joy’s books so far 🙂

If you’re curious about the book feel free to place your questions to Jennifer, I’m sure she will love to answer anything you would like to know 🙂

 

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Filed under giveaway

The Trouble with Horses

the trouble with horses4 stars

I don’t usually buy Novelas, even if the premise is interesting, I always prefer to read longer books than a short story. But I had just finished Compromised by J. Dawn King, and the excerpt of The Trouble with Horses was in the end of the book, so I gave it a try.

Truth is, I really loved the excerpt and the premise! And once more I was proven wrong when it comes to “rejecting” something in JAFF! I should know by now that even if there are genres I prefer, I should not exclude anything in JAFF! The Trouble with Horses proved me I cannot deny novellas, as I may end up loving them as much as I love a longer book.

The novella starts with Elizabeth finding a lost horse that leads her to an injured Mr. Darcy in the middle of the forest and surrounded with snakes. Obviously, our heroine will scare off the snakes and get help for the unknown gentleman who is then taken to Longbourn for recovery.

You may imagine how the stories goes from here 🙂

Mary’s character was a surprise in this book. I liked how the author was able to give more importance to this character by making her the love interest of another much loved hero :).

Mary is one of those characters I always like to see developed. I think that Austen’s character was not meant to be very interesting, but I also feel there is a lot of potential in her to be developed in JAFF.

There was a detail I particularly liked in this story, and I know the Portuguese readers will like it as much as I did  🙂 The author quoted a part Sir Walter Scott’s The Vision of Don Roderick that mentions Portugal. A small detail, I know, but it always makes me smile.

I also liked the scenarios and how the story evolved. I was just sorry that this book was indeed very short and could be read in a couple of hours. I think it has all the potential to be a great longer book, and I wish the author will consider developing this book in the future by adding more scenes to it. I would enjoy reading more scenes of Elizabeth taking care of Darcy after the accident, more interactions between them in Hertfordshire, and much more story in London. I think the story is very well put together, but by extending it, the author would make it even better.

If you like short stories or novelas, I think you will love this book!

The Trouble with Horses is Available at:

Amazon.com – The Trouble with Horses

Amazon.co.uk  –The Trouble With Horses: A Pride & Prejudice Variation Novella

Amazon.fr – The Trouble With Horses: A Pride & Prejudice Variation Novella

 

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Filed under 4 stars, Uncategorized

Earning Darcy’s Trust

earning darcy's trust4 stars

Jennifer Joy’s writing is so good that it gets me glued to her books for hours!

While I’m captivated by the premise in some books, in Jennifer’s I have to say that it is the way she develops her stories and her characters that keeps me wanting to read more and more. I’m not saying that the premises are not good in her books, by the contrary, they are quite interesting, but her writing is definitely her strongest characteristic for me. The way she writes increases the quality of her books exponentially. Earning Darcy’s Trust is the second book I read from this author, and for the second time, I go to bed after reading it wanting to write about it. That is something that does not happen with every book I read, and it has to be the merit of the author.

In this book Darcy decides to take Georgiana to Netherfield with him, and her presence will change everything! The storyline will be quite similar to the one Austen created, but Georgiana’s presence along with another new character and all the story that is behind him, will change the Darcy/Elizabeth relationship.

I liked the new Darcy/Elizabeth scenes the author created and their dialogues. Their discussions were very good, and the way they profess their love in the end of book really touched my heart. I think it is because I really identify myself with the way Jennifer Joy expressed Darcy and Elizabeth’s feelings and inner thoughts.

I particularly liked reading Elizabeth say “I am as much yours as you are mine” and Darcy confessing “she is my complement. Where I am week, she is strong”. For me these sentences are very strong and transpire a love that is transcendent. They correspond to what I believe Darcy and Elizabeth’s love is all about.

I also loved the way Jennifer gave some importance to Mr. Hurst and how she changed his character. Or should I say, how she showed us how he can be when not sleeping or inebriated?

I really liked seeing him take some action and actually speak. This is something I never saw in a JAFF book before, so it really stood out and got my attention.

The way Georgiana’s attitude evolved during the book was very interesting as well. I liked to see how Elizabeth’s influence helped her grow. We always see Mr. Darcy saying that Elizabeth’s presence will help Georgiana, but in this book we actually see it happen.

The only thing I didn’t like as much in this book is the reaction Mr. Darcy has when the true killer of his father is revealed. I would imagine him angrier, not being able to think of anything else. I would also prefer to have Darcy talk with Elizabeth about his feelings in a more private situation, but I understand the scene itself was meant to create some humour.

Overall, I really liked this Earning Darcy’s Trust, and because Jennifer’s writing was one of the things that made me like the book so much, I will leave you with 2 of my favourite sentences in this book:

“She loved a good challenge. Perhaps that was what drew her to Fitzwilliam Darcy at first. There was nothing simple about him”.

“They would fight. They would love. But most of all, they would live”.

Earning Darcy’s Trust is available at:
Amazon.com – Earning Darcy’s Trust

Amazon.co.uk – Earning Darcy’s Trust: A Pride & Prejudice Variation

Amazon.fr – Earning Darcy’s Trust: A Pride & Prejudice Variation

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Filed under 4 stars, Pride and Prejudice

Mr. Darcy to the rescue

Mr_ Darcy to the Rescue3.5 stars

I had recently written that I would really like to read a book where Mr. Darcy knew of Mr. Collins proposal. I always thought it would be interesting to read about his reaction to this news. But in my mind I always thought about Mr. Darcy discovering Collins had proposed, rushing to Longbourn to try ascertain the situation and discovering that Elizabeth had refused Mr. Collins.

Visctoria Kincaid took this to a whole different level! What if Elizabeth was about to refuse Mr. Collins when she discovered her father was very ill and could die in the next months? What if this new information made her accept Mr. Collins to secure stability to her family? And what if Mr. Darcy discovered she was engaged to Mr. Collins after the fact?

This premise was even better than what I had imagined. I loved it! Mr. Darcy realizes he cannot live without Elizabeth and he cannot bear to see her married to someone else, especially Mr. Collins, so he comes to the rescue!

Mr. Darcy travels to Longbourn in the hopes of ending Elizabeth’s engagement to Mr. Collins and gaining her affection, but of course, things are never this simple and we end up visiting Kent, Derbyshire and London as well. One of the things I loved in this book is that we visit all these places in the company of Elizabeth and Mr. Darcy.

We are constantly reading about their interactions, of course there are other characters, but Elizabeth and Darcy are present in most of the book, and this is something I really enjoy. After reading so many JAFF books I confess I’m more and more interested in Elizabeth and Darcy’s interactions than the rescue of Lydia, for example. Even though I did like Lydia’s rescue in this book. I will not give any details as I don’t want to spoil it for you, but it is very funny.

The journey is lighthearted, fresh and funny. I adored reading the book from the perspective of both characters, and I loved reading their thoughts in the middle of the conversations. It made me feel closer to them, and it made the book funnier.

The Darcy in this book is romantic, decided, but with his natural flaws which just makes him perfect. Elizabeth is true to herself and we see her fall in love with Darcy in a charming way.

This is the 3rd book I’ve read from Victoria Kincaid, and once again she wrote a book that is never boring and that keeps urging us to read it without stopping. I was just sad it was so short. I would like to have read much more, for example, more Darcy scenes by himself at Netherfield, more interactions at Rosings between Elizabeth and Lady Catherine, but also between Lizzy and Darcy, more Elizabeth’s confidences to Jane in Pemberley, etc.

I consider this book quite different from the other 2 I have read from Victoria Kincaid (and that I loved!) which proves to me she is really a creative writer. She can write different types of books and provide us pleasurable moments each time. The only reason I didn’t rate this book higher is because of the length, but definitely a good book to read.

 

Mr. Darcy to the Rescue is available at :

Amazon.com – Mr. Darcy to the Rescue

Amazon.co.uk – Mr. Darcy to the Rescue: A Pride and Prejudice Variation

Amazon.fr – Mr. Darcy to the Rescue: A Pride and Prejudice Variation (English Edition)

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Sketching Mr. Darcy

sketching mr darcy4 stars

I had wondered why I never read a book where Mr. Darcy would find out about Elizabeth’s refusal of Mr. Collins’ offer right after it occurred. It was always something I thought I would enjoy reading about.

Lory Lilian finally made it real! It wasn’t what I expected or imagined because the consequences of such information were practically inexistent, but still, this was an excellent beginning and kept me interested in the book.

What if Mr. Darcy encountered Lizzie on the day of his departure from Netherfield and she was freezing and completely wet from falling into a pond? He would obviously help her, and assist her to get home, but what if rumours were to start from there? Mr. Darcy would be bound by honour to make Elizabeth an offer of marriage, and taking into consideration the rumours…she would have to accept.

This is how Sketching Mr. Darcy starts, and in my opinion it is a very good idea. I liked the premise and I loved the fact that Mr. Darcy did not change after being engaged to Elizabeth. He continue to be himself, but as she got to know him better, she got to understand him. At first, I did not enjoy having Darcy proposing to Elizabeth without admitting to anyone, not even himself that he was in love with her. I believed this would take away the intensity of the book. But it didn’t, by the contrary, it was essential to create an atmosphere of true understanding, respect and love between both characters.
Instead of having Darcy loving Elizabeth and trying to make her love him, we see Darcy also falling in love with Elizabeth. We see him finding many aspects to love in Elizabeth and not just her wit and playfulness. This was something I really loved. Lory Lilian was able to create a very solid story with a profound character development. For example, Elizabeth and Mr. Darcy do argue at times, but their arguments are actually based on relevant aspects. Unlike many books where the argument is not valid, credible or important, but just based on some childish stubbornness by one or the other, in this book we see arguments with a valid foundation.

Also, even though some readers might find the book a little too slow paced, there was always something to look forward to in it. When the author answered what we wanted to read, she immediately created another situation that we wanted to see unfolded. The entire book was well structured. And the characters were perfect. This Darcy was perfect and Elizabeth as well. I found her struggle between behaving as Elizabeth Bennett would have or as Elizabeth Darcy should quite interesting. The new characters were a plus as well, Annabelle Stratford was a good addition to create some jealousy, but also to demonstrate the strength of their love and the impressive way how Elizabeth could handle situations.

I did love the book. Lory Lillian was always one author that kept appearing on my must read list, but for some reason, I never read anything from her until this month. I wish I had done it before, as she is definitely one author worth Reading!

Sketching Mr. Darcy is available at:

Amazon.com-  Sketching Mr. Darcy

Amazon.co.uk – Sketching Mr. Darcy: A Pride and Prejudice alternative journey

Amazon.fr – Sketching Mr. Darcy: A Pride and Prejudice alternative journey

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